Deathscapes

'See you in the funny pages: penal sites, teletechnics, counter-artifactualities'

Deathscapes

‘See you in the funny pages: penal sites, teletechnics, counter-artifactualities’

Illustration by Chris Kelly depicts a hooded fish strapped to a chair used for torture. It recalls the image of Dylan Voller in the Don Dale Youth Detention Centre.

Chris Kelly, Cartoon for Eaten Fish. Reproduced in article with permission(www.chriskelly.net.au).

ABSTRACT: A 2016 image by cartoonist Chris Kelly powerfully brings together two regimes of detention in Australia, one ‘domestic’ and directed largely at Indigenous prisoners, the other ‘offshore’, and directed at refugees and asylum seekers. In both cases, it was CCTV footage which provided the means of exposure of violent abuses in these detention systems, although this exposure simultaneously exposes the very failure of CCTV, as a mechanism deigned precisely to magnify the state’s powers of surveillance. This paper traces the interactions between inmates, advocates, activists and artists in these two campaigns of exposure. It reprises James Der Derian’s 2001 concept of MIME-NET (Military-Industrial-Media-Entertainment Network) to explore the possibilities of a new social activism of images.

Read full article ‘See you in the funny pages: penal sites, teletechnics, counter-artifactualities’ by Suvendrini Perera.

 


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All viewers are respectfully advised that the site contains images of and references to the deaths in custody of Indigenous peoples, Black people and refugees that may cause distress.

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