Deathscapes

‘In Hunting Ground (Pastoral), Van Diemen's Land, 2016-2017, Gough delves into colonial sites of Indigenous massacre in Tasmania and she exposes their occlusion by settler history.’

Deathscapes

Julie Gough is a Trawlwoolway artist, freelance curator and writer who lives in Hobart. Gough’s research and art practice often involve uncovering and re-presenting conflicting and subsumed histories, many referring to her maternal family’s experiences as Tasmanian Aboriginal people. In Hunting Ground (Pastoral), Van Diemen’s Land, 2016-2017, Gough delves into colonial sites of Indigenous massacre in Tasmania and she exposes their occlusion by settler history. Joseph Pugliese’ essay, ‘Julie Gough’s Forensic Archaeology of National Forgetting,’ speaks to this violent settler history in the context of Gough’s powerful artwork.

Joseph Pugliese, ‘Julie Gough’s Forensic Archaeology of National Forgetting’


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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are respectfully advised that this website contains images of and references to deceased persons.

All viewers are respectfully advised that the site contains images of and references to the deaths in custody of Indigenous peoples, Black people and refugees that may cause distress.

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