Deathscapes

Dying in Isolation

Deathscapes

Dying in Isolation

After Moises had settled in his new cell, the LPN went back to the medical unit to call the NP again. The NP said that Moises should be sent to the emergency room (ER), which was located in a local hospital, if he did not show signs of improvement over the next 30 minutes. The LPN then called Unit E and asked that they prepare Moises to be transported to the ER.

Moises was not sent to the ER however. In reviewing his medical records, the LPN learned that Moises had stopped taking his anti-seizure medication. She called back the NP to relay this information. The NP surmised that Moises’ failure to take his medication likely brought on the seizure. She ordered that Moises be monitored for 30 minutes and be educated about the importance of taking his medicine.

After the conversation, the LPN went back to Moises’s cell to relay the NP’s instructions about the anti-seizure medication, which Moises agreed to resume taking, and to monitor him. At this point, the LPN could still have sent Moises to the ER if she deemed it necessary. However, she determined that he was improving and that the right thing to do medically was simply to monitor him. She stayed to watch Moises for a few minutes and then had to leave to perform other duties. He would not be seen again by medical staff until two and a half hours later when there was a medical emergency call from Unit E. Only officers checked in on him (about every 15 minutes).

At about 4:15 pm, an officer doing a 15 minute check noticed Moises lying on his stomach, with his face straight down on the mattress. He had suffered another seizure. The officer knocked on the window of the cell door. When he received no response, he decided to go in. Once in the cell, the officer first shook Moises, who did not respond. He then turned Moises’ head and vomit came out of his mouth. The officer called for assistance at this point. While waiting for others to arrive, he checked Moises breath and pulse. He was not breathing and did not have a pulse.

Officers performed CPR and chest compressions on Moises until an ambulance arrived. He was then transported to St. Francis Medical Center and placed on life support in the intensive care unit. Moises never regained consciousness. Tests showed that he was brain-dead. On September 27, Moises’ family approved the discontinuation of life support. He was pronounced dead at 4:05 p.m. The official cause of death was brain injury, which resulted from seizure-induced cardiac arrest.

[BREAK]

 

Nebraska State Patrol interview with LPN.
Nebraska State Patrol interview with LPN. She too was interviewed by immigration officials for the detainee death review. Her interview is also not available.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Incident report of officer who found Moises after his final seizure.
Incident report of officer who found Moises after his final seizure.


Sharing

Please Read

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are respectfully advised that this website contains images of and references to deceased persons.

All viewers are respectfully advised that the site contains images of and references to the deaths in custody of Indigenous peoples, Black people and refugees that may cause distress.

Proceed