Case Study

Perpetual Insecurity: the weaponisation of mental health (Australia) [Forthcoming]

Case study

Refugees, people seeking asylum and migrants who are living in the community on temporary visas are invisibilised subjects who face persistent threats to their safety and well-being. They occupy a  virtual zone of terror where the risk of re-detention, deportation and destitution are omnipresent. Despite living outside a detention centre, they remain unfree, subject to indefinite insecurity. For many of these invisible detainees, their mental suffering becomes weaponised, part of the constant pressure to self-deport. For others, the unrelenting sense of insecurity has proved to be a form of slow killing, an outcome of policies that refuse asylum and enforce a state of permanent limbo. This case study considers the cases of Khodayar Amini, Leorsin Seemanpillai, Saeed Hassanloo, Majid Hassanloo, Dr Habib Wahedy, Fazel Chegeni Nejad, Raza, Mohammad Nasim Najafi among the several other refugees, asylum seekers and migrants on temporary visas or without status, who died while living in Australia between 2001-2017.

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are respectfully advised that this case study may contain images of and references to deceased persons.

All viewers are respectfully advised that this study contains images of and references to the deaths in custody of Indigenous peoples, Black people and refugees that may cause distress.

At the same time, each screen of these case studies testifies to target communities' strength and courage, as they respond to repeated deaths in custody through myriad creative forms, through lines of solidarity and through an unwavering call for justice.

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are respectfully advised that this website contains images of and references to deceased persons.

All viewers are respectfully advised that the site contains images of and references to the deaths in custody of Indigenous peoples, Black people and refugees that may cause distress.

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