Deathscapes

Ms Dhu 10c - No Accountability

Deathscapes

No Accountability

On the morning of 16 December 2016, members of Ms Dhu’s family, community, campaign group and supporters alongside a swarm of lawyers, journalists and reporters anxiously waited outside Court 51 of the Perth Magistrates Court.

When the court was finally opened, the Coroner, at rapid pace, read through key summaries and recommendations and then handed down her inquest findings. White envelopes holding hard copies of the 165 page document, which included 11 recommendations, were handed to Aunty Carol Roe, Della Roe and Mr Dhu via G4S court security officers. No referrals to the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) or Worksafe WA were made.

Ms Dhu’s family considered that the Inquest failed to seek accountability and justice for Ms Dhu’s death.

According to Perea and Pugliese, the Coroner’s consistent deployment of terminologies such as ‘unprofessional’ and ‘inhumane’ instantiates a refusal by the state to recognise the violence of racism and consequent culpability for potentially criminal negligence that were evident throughout the case.

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A group of people outside the Coroner's court hold A1 and A2 sized placards and a banner that reads 'Justice 4 Julieka'.[imagecaption] Activists gathered outside court on the day of the Inquest Findings, Whadjuk Country (Perth), 2016. Photo: Charandev Singh. [/imagecaption]

During the week before the 3rd Anniversary of Ms Dhu’s death, ABC 7:30 Report spoke to Ms Dhu’s family about their ongoing campaign for justice and struggle for accountability. They lodged a claim of misconduct leading to death in the Supreme Court of WA and a racial discrimination complaint to the Australian Human Rights Commission, which could progress to the Federal Court.

 


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