Deathscapes

Ms Dhu 14a - Justice for Ms Dhu Campaign

Deathscapes

Making Deaths in Custody Visible: Justice for Ms Dhu

Ms Dhu’s family continues to lead a tireless campaign for justice with the support of the First Nations Deaths in Custody Watch Committee. Shaun Harris (her uncle), Aunty Carol Roe (her nana) and Della Roe (her mother) have ensured that Ms Dhu will be remembered. Her death has been the most widely discussed and reported case of an Aboriginal woman in custody in Australia and this can be attributed largely to the work of her family and their supporters.

Just as Ms Dhu’s death can be situated within an extensive catalogue of deaths of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in police and prison custody, the activism surrounding her death can likewise be situated in a history of resistance that has frequently been led by Aboriginal women. As Carolyn Lewis, an auntie of Ms Dhu and co-chair of the First Nations Deaths in Custody Watch Committee, writes:  ‘women walking with Julieka have come together to fight for her, they’ve stood as one in solidarity and strength amongst each other, with care and love.’ The efforts of the community in response to Ms Dhu’s untimely death made visible the violence to which Aboriginal women continue to be subject in Australia’s custodial and medical institutions.

 


‘We want all parties to be held accountable, be it the partner who started all of this…and of course the police and health service…They are all accountable.’

Shaun Harris (Ms Dhu’s Uncle)

The struggle for justice continues.


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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are respectfully advised that this website contains images of and references to deceased persons.

All viewers are respectfully advised that the site contains images of and references to the deaths in custody of Indigenous peoples, Black people and refugees that may cause distress.

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