Deathscapes

Tina Fontaine 9c - Her voice was stolen

Deathscapes

‘Her voice was stolen’

Quote from Thelma Favel which reads 'There is no sense. They just don't care. Nobody seems to care when it comes to Aboriginal children...As long as they get their pay cheques and do a little bit of work and make a couple of phone calls.' The quote is overlaid on a photo of a frozen river.

[imagecaption] Quote:Thelma Favel. Photo: Aquilatin on Pixabay. [/imagecaption]

[BREAK]

Tina Michelle Fontaine, an Inuit and Métis girl, spent much of her brief life on the Sagkeeng First Nation community, 120 kilometres north of Winnipeg. Tina lived with her great aunt Thelma Favel, Thelma’s husband and her younger sister, Sarah.  ‘She was a kind girl who liked to study math and science and had lots of friends and never got into trouble’ her aunt recounted.

In June 2014 Tina left her aunt’s care to go to Winnipeg to reconnect with her birth mother. Tina is reported to have been very affected by the impending trial into her father’s murder. He was beaten to death in a violent bar brawl in 2011, a loss that deeply affected Tina. She was asked to write a victim impact statement for the court.

For about six weeks before her disappearance, Tina became the ward of the Manitoba Child and Family Services. She came into contact with social workers, police and the health care system, and was housed in a series of hostels and hotels.

 

 


Sharing

Please Read

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are respectfully advised that this website contains images of and references to deceased persons.

All viewers are respectfully advised that the site contains images of and references to the deaths in custody of Indigenous peoples, Black people and refugees that may cause distress.

Proceed