Deathscapes

Lynette Daley 11d - A target of male violence

Deathscapes

A target of male violence

A map showing the location (Ten Mile Beach in NSW) where Lynette Daley's naked and bloodied body was found. This was 5.5km south of the Black Rocks Campground and about 15km north of Iluka.

[imagecaption] Lynette Daley’s naked and bloodied body was found on the beach 5.5km south of the Black Rocks Campground and about 15km north of Iluka. She no longer had a pulse by the time the two men responsible for her death called for help. They burned the blood-soaked mattress she had been laying on, along with her bra and some other items a couple of hours before paramedics and police were called and arrived at the site. [/imagecaption]

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Lynette Daley’s family remember her as beautiful, loving and kind-hearted and recall how she had been a strong and competitive child. They observed a change in her teenage years when she became a target of male violence. Lynette had survived relationships, including with the fathers of her children, in which she was the target of multiple forms of violence, abuse and control. Her mother, Thelma, and stepfather, Gordon, recall how Lynette sought assistance from the police on a few occasions; however they rarely intervened.  One of her Aunties remembers Lynette staying with her on multiple occasions while seeking shelter from domestic violence. Because of concerns for the safety of Lynette’s children, Thelma, Gordon and Lynette’s sister Joanne took them into their care.

Lynette Daley’s life was taken from her on an isolated beach by two white men on Invasion Day – a day deeply significant to the history of sexual violence against Aboriginal women in Australia. She suffered an extremely violent and horrifying death after years of trying to escape male violence.


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