Deathscapes

Indigenous Femicide and the Killing State 3a - The ‘vaporous crime spree’ of rape and death

Deathscapes

The ‘vaporous crime spree’ of rape and death

[imagecaption] ‘Vanished‘, SBS, 2017. [/imagecaption]

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Across Australia, as in Canada and the US, violence is a large and lethal part of life for many Aboriginal women. In Australia and Canada respectively, while Indigenous women only account for about 3% and 4% of the female population, they account for approximately 16% of female homicide victims.

Destroy the Joint, which was established in 2012, has attempted to document Femicide in Australia through their ‘Counting Dead Women’ initiative. Following on from this, Celeste Liddle, an Arrernte woman, community organiser and writer attempted to identify what percentage of these women were Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. The RED HEART campaign has also mapped Australian Femicide and child death. A study on Femicide in Australia by Mouzos published in 1999, indicated that the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women killed by an intimate partner was higher than Caucasian and Asian women and that it was very rare for Indigenous victims to be killed by a stranger. It also suggested that Indigenous women were more likely to be killed somewhere other than a private residence, whereas non-Indigenous women were overwhelming killed in their homes. In Canada, the Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice and Accountability was started in 2017 and has since attempted to monitor and map femicide cases.


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