Deathscapes

Highway of Tears 7e - Amber Tuccaro

Deathscapes

Amber Tuccaro


‘I am 56 years old now and raising a little boy that is so full of energy… He drives me crazy but at the same time, he’s my sanity. I mean, he is all that I have left of my baby.’

Vivian Tuccaro, Mother of Amber Tuccaro


[BREAK]

Amber Alyssa Tuccaro was a young mother from Mikisew Cree First Nation who loved to sing and was known for making people laugh. She was last seen on 18 August 2010 setting out to hitchhike into Edmonton from the nearby town of Nisku. She was picked up by a man in a vehicle and during the ride managed to covertly call her brother, who at the time was being held in the Edmonton Remand Centre. The seventeen-minute call was recorded as a matter of routine. On the recording, only parts of which were released by the RCMP, Amber’s increasingly panicked voice can be heard: Where are we by? Where are we going?  An unidentified male voice assures Amber that they are on a backroad that would eventually lead to the city. After the call abruptly disconnected Amber Tuccaro was never heard from again. Two years later her remains were found in a farmer’s field.

When Amber’s mother reported concerns about her whereabouts, police suggested that she was just out partying and ‘would call her or something’. Her mother battled to get Amber’s name onto the missing persons list. A review by the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission later found that the RCMP investigation was ‘deficient’ in several ways and that ‘various members did not comply with various policies, procedures and guidelines’.

In July 2019 the RCMP announced it would make a formal apology to Amber’s family. Nine years after she went missing and seven years after her body was found, her killer or killers remain unknown.


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